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A Back the Blue decal is affixed to the side of Graham Rahal’s IndyCar before the continuation of an auto race suspended because of inclement weather in June, at Texas Motor Speedway, Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Larry Papke)

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Most of the stories we read regarding anti-police sentiment being expressed by elected officials usually come from big far-left cities like Seattle and Portland.

But as one recent incident shows us, such sentiments are not confined to large cities.

A Twitter user by the name “@farm_witch” tweeted a photo to Somerville, MA Mayor Joe Curtatone (D) on Saturday of a “Thin Blue Line” flag that was displayed on the back of a local fire truck. “Is the fire department allowed to display a thin blue line flag?” the woman asked in a now-deleted tweet:

Mayor Curtatone, who has been the man in charge in Somerville since 2004, responded the next day by noting the flags “are off the trucks” and that an investigation was now underway to find out just “how they got there.”

He also expressed hope that the firefighters who, like police officers, put their lives on the line daily “people who did this” horrible thing of expressing support for law enforcement officers “did not realize how hurtful it would be to people in our community”:

I saved his response, too, in the event he figures out how stupid he sounds and deletes it:

Ms. Farm Witch has since hidden her account behind the “locked” wall, presumably because of the pushback she received.

The mayor was understandably ratioed by other Twitter users who took exception to his ridiculous response:

Other Twitter users pointed out a “BLM” banner is flying above city hall:

So the city can express support for BLM but local firefighters cannot openly express support for the police. Okay.

According to Wikipedia, Somerville is “located directly to the northwest of Boston, and north of Cambridge”, which explains quite a bit. They also note a 2019 population estimate of 81,360.

It’s bad enough to have anti-police movements take root in places like New York City and L.A. It’s even worse when they take root in the smaller communities that have a much deeper local connection to law enforcement. This is why it’s very important to pay attention to the words and actions of local leaders and hold them accountable at the ballot box in the event they don’t get their act together.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
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