AP featured image
Demonstrators try to topple a steel fence during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Saturday, July 25, 2020, in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

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At a time when so many supposed “leaders” including the presumptive Democratic nominee for president refuse to acknowledge and/or unequivocally condemn the Antifa rioting that has turned major American cities into hellholes, seeing a company take a stand against them is a beautiful sight to behold.

The Twitter account “Antifa International”, not an official account but one that is generally considered authentic, pitched a fit Friday after finding out that eCommerce website Teespring was pulling Antifa-related merch from their site because “the word ‘Antifa … is in violation of our acceptable use policy and not permitted on Teespring.com'”:

The account then laughably proclaimed the word “Antifa” did not violate the acceptable use policy because “it doesn’t harass specific individuals” (not true), “it doesn’t promote a terrorist group or activity” (not true), “it doesn’t promote illegal activity” (not true), and “it doesn’t glorify harm/violence” (definitely not true):

Supporters of Antifa’s thuggish tactics poured on the outrage, and accused Teespring of “supporting fascism” or something because of their site policy:

I won’t bore you with any more of the responses because most of them were the same type of vapid whinging we’ve come to expect from basement dwellers, so let’s just skip right on to the good part.

After they received yet another complaint about their decision to stop selling Antifa merch and another accusation that they were “fascist sympathisers”, Teespring had had enough:

Just think of what better, safer places Democrat-run cities like Portland and Seattle would be right now if city “leaders” took a similar stance against Antifa – and stuck to it.

It hasn’t been confirmed yet, but I hear that there’s a wahmbulance on standby for the more fauxfended among them. The world’s tiniest violin is also playing for them, or so I’ve heard, way way off in the distance.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
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