As word comes down from Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, that she wants the FBI to investigate her allegations before she testifies before the Senate Committee — a hearing she’s been invited to scheduled for next Monday — it becomes clearer she’s uncomfortable being asked to defend her allegations in person.

In a letter addressed to Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa, and obtained by CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360,” Christine Blasey Ford’s attorneys argue that “a full investigation by law enforcement officials will ensure that the crucial facts and witnesses in this matter are assessed in a non-partisan manner, and that the Committee is fully informed before conducting any hearing or making any decisions.”
The letter from Ford’s lawyers notes that despite receiving a “stunning amount of support from her community,” Ford has also “been the target of vicious harassment and even death threats” and has been forced to leave her home.
“We would welcome the opportunity to talk with you and Ranking Member Feinstein to discuss reasonable steps as to how Dr. Ford can cooperate while also taking care of her own health and security,” the letter from Ford’s lawyers said.
Meanwhile, Kavanaugh does not seem to have such reservations, expressing an almost immediate desire to take part in a hearing — after several grueling days of marathon confirmation hearings — to defend his innocence.
Ford’s call for an investigation by the federal police force looks to be an even stronger indication that she simply does not want to appear and speak (if you’ll forgive the expression) her truth. The Department of Justice has already issued a statement saying that it’s not their job to ascertain the credibility of allegations, particularly ones that don’t pertain to a federal crime.

The Justice Department says the sexual assault allegation against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh “does not involve any potential federal crime” for the FBI to investigate.

The department said in a statement Monday night that the FBI’s role during background investigations is to evaluate whether the nominee could pose a national security risk and then provide that information “for the use of the decision makers.”

The department says it’s not the job of the FBI to judge the significance or the credibility of an accusation.

But Ford and her lawyer continue to ask for one. Which seems to indicate the smear machine — the one of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas — doesn’t seem to be quite as effective this go round. And Ford and her supporters have never really answered, or even tried to answer, why she, with allegations of an assault that she can’t really remember and never clearly connected Kavanaugh to by name, is more credible than he is in his denial. Or why her word is to be believed over the 60 plus other women who have defended Kavanaugh as a man of impeccable character.

Of course, should Kavanaugh be confirmed, he’ll have to deal with petty little whispers for the rest of his career, and maybe that’s really what this has all been about and will be enough to sate progressives who have been terrified of his nomination since it was announced.

But if Ford doesn’t show up to the hearing, and continues to request an investigation when the rationale for not having one is reasonable and has been appropriately explained, Kavanaugh may survive his gauntlet through the hail-mary attempt to keep him off the court.

Which is more evidence that the progressive hold over the way our government functions is slipping. And that’s good news.