I recorded this week’s show before news broke yesterday of the hit on Soleimani — and yes, Ben Rhodes, we meant to do it — so unfortunately you won’t get my “ums” and “ahs” over working that one out in my brain on the show this week. For the record, if what Secretary of State Pompeo says is true, and Soliemani was traveling the region making plans to attack Americans, then we did exactly what we should have done and eliminated that threat. We’ve also perhaps helped the Iraqi people and others in the region by giving them a chance to free themselves from a regime that conscripts them into terrorism as a profession. Will there be consequences? Undoubtedly. But I’m betting the administration weighed them and decided the benefits of taking out a terrorist leader were heavier. And there are doubtless future plans we’ll be seeing unfold in coming weeks. Pray for our men and women who do this job in hostile places.

Now onto the show!

I wrote last week about the rise of anti-semitism in places like New York and how one enterprising Congressman was addressing it by reaffirming the 1964 Civil Rights Act. I didn’t write about how brilliant I think that is.

The African-American and Jewish communities worked together effectively during the nation’s fight for civil rights back in the 60s. The relationships are legendary and explored in films like “Mississippi Burning,” et al. So it is particularly sad to see that there has been an effort to stoke discord between these communities — and, at risk of sounding conspiratorial, I think there has been — who have a unique bond that contributed to the growth of the country. Some of the unrest, I’m sure, is organic. But some of it is fomented in the press and by leaders who like to keep people fighting because they can use the dissatisfaction as signature platform issues to stay in power. It’s really nothing new.

But whatever may be happening in these communities of people, there is never any excuse — ever — to attack innocent people or to campaign for hate against a religious group or race because you don’t like what individuals members may have done at some point. Rep. Doug Collins, in going back to the 1964 Civil Rights Act and reminding people of what the nation fought against then and what we were trying to achieve, is a necessary reminder at a crucial time.

If you can get past the rustling you’ll hear on this week’s episode (my dog was moving around on the bed quite a bit because there was some bad weather happening), you’ll also be treated (heh) to my thoughts on when I think impeachment might end (soon, if indicators hold) and what I made of the new Ryan Reynolds/Michael Bay joint on Netflix called “6 Underground” (trailer below).

There’s some stuff in there about sports philosophy, too, born of a few statements following one of the college football games. Sometimes I think sports philosophy is the best philosophy available.

Have a listen!

The show lives below on Spotify and you can also find me at iHeart radio, Apple PodcastsFCB Radio’s Spreaker, and Deezer.