If you were conscious at any point in the 1990s you know the answer to that question. But today, perhaps for the first time since the Clintons appeared on the national stage, the Washington Post has actually taken some time to cover Hillary’s obscene history of abusing women who were sexually abused by her husband in the context of something other than studying the “vast right wing conspiracy.”

The article pulls up some insightful quotes from Hillary and from previous associates;

In an ABC News interview, she called Flowers “some failed cabaret singer who doesn’t even have much of a résumé to fall back on.” She told Esquire magazine in 1992 that if she had the chance to cross-examine Flowers, “I mean, I would crucify her.”

Six years later, Bill Clinton acknowledged a sexual encounter with Flowers.

Former White House press secretary George Stephanopoulos recalled in his memoir discussing a woman’s allegation published in Penthouse Magazine. He said that after her husband dismissed it as untrue during a meeting, Hillary Clinton said, “We have to destroy her story.”

In 1994, former Arkansas state employee Paula Jones alleged in a lawsuit that Bill Clinton groped her in a hotel room three years earlier. Hillary Clinton wrote in her autobiography, “Living History,” that she erred in opposing an early settlement.

Eventually, Bill Clinton settled for $850,000. During discovery, Jones’s attorneys found out about White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

Her husband denied the relationship, and Hillary Clinton blamed the allegations on a “vast right-wing conspiracy.”

Asked on “Good Morning America” if her husband had been truthful, she said, “I know he has.”

A former White House aide who spoke on the conditions of anonymity to talk about private discussions said Hillary Clinton blamed the scandal on political enemies and insisted that privacy was sacred.

Bill Clinton admitted his untruthfulness in August 1998.

And on and on.

After building a damning case for the “enabler” side of the argument they attempt to achieve some balance in their closing:

“I think she felt that she had committed her life to this guy,” Jim Blair said. “They can debate politics from breakfast until bedtime and never get tired of it. She wanted to spend the rest of her life with him. She loved him. It’s as simple as that.”

The reader is left with two stark choices to explain the behavior. The most charitable one is probably the one that says her career plan was based on sharing Bill Clinton’s bed and she was willing to put up with whatever he did and to savage the battalion of women he had extramarital sex with if they opened their mouths if it advanced her goal. She was able to play noble victim but in the process she condoned the worst possible behavior from her “husband” and modeled the worst sort of male-female relationship for her daughter in the process.

The other is that she was actually in love with the guy and every time he swore he wouldn’t cheat again she believed him and defended him and was made a fool and laughingstock by him. The first reason is at least understandable. The latter is nothing short of pathetic.