As my colleague Jennifer Van Laar wrote last week, Carl’s Jr. CEO Andy Puzder looks to be Donald Trump’s new Secretary of Labor. In fact, right now the nomination looks pretty solid:

President-elect Donald Trump is expected to name fast-food executive Andy Puzder as labor secretary, according to people familiar with the decision.

Mr. Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants Holdings Inc., the parent company of the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s burger chains, has been a vocal advocate for cutting back regulations he says have stifled growth in the restaurant industry, which represents 10% of the American workforce.

Mr. Puzder, an adviser and contributor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, has criticized the Affordable Care Act and has argued against raising the federal minimum wage higher than $9 an hour. Democrats have called for raising the federal minimum wage for as high as $15.

 Mr. Puzder is on the board of the International Franchise Association, a trade group that has criticized the Obama administration, saying it attacked the franchising model by implementing regulations that stunt job growth. Instead of focusing on stepping up workplace regulation to create jobs and higher wages, Mr. Puzder would likely call for tools such as an overhaul of the tax system, said Matt Haller, a spokesman for the franchise trade group.

Much like the nomination of Scott Pruitt to head EPA, Puzder’s nomination has started a chain reaction of exploding heads on the left. The most hilarious is the “oppo dump” by the assclownish Igor Volsky who is the Deputy Director for the John Podesta-run Center for American Progress Action Fund. To put Volsky’s critique in context, his entire work history consists of being a leftwing blogger and apparent bouts of gay sex (NTTAWWT).

Stop the freakin presses.

“The feds can mandate a higher wage, but some jobs don’t produce enough economic value to bear the increase.”

And, get this, the heartless bastard replaced low end jobs… those that can’t produce enough economic value to support themselves… with machines. Crap. Didn’t this happen during the Industrial Revolution, too? If this wasn’t from noted economic expert Igor Volsky I’d think someone was having me on.

This qualifies as opposition research these days? Quoting a very basic principle that you’d find in any microeconomics text is now a disqualification for holding a government position. It is no longer permissible for a Secretary of Labor to understand the relationship between wages and employment?

Of course, that does explain the last eight years rather well.