Last September, I posted on a man in Harrisonburg, Virginia, who was sort of a walking stereotype:

A Virginia Young Democrat working for a Democrat-aligned voter registration group got caught filing applications on behalf of dead people when he filed an application for a deceased World War II veteran who was known by a local clerk.

Andrew Spieles, a James Madison University student working for HarrisonburgVotes, confessed earlier this month that he submitted 19 applications for deceased individuals, according to a report in the local Daily News-Record.

The Washington Post reported on Thursday that one of those individuals was Richard Allen Claybrook Sr., who died in 2014 at the age of 87. Claybrook was known by a clerk in the voting registration office as a former Fairfax elementary school principal.

The 19 applications were submitted through HarrisonburgVotes, which is run by Joe Fitzgerald, a prominent local Democrat. Fitzgerald is chairman of his congressional district’s Democratic Committee.

Now Spieles is on his way to prison:

James Madison University student Andrew J. Spieles, 21, of Harrisonburg, pled guilty Monday in the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia. As part of the plea agreement, Spieles agreed to a prison sentence of 100 to 120 days.

Spieles worked for Harrisonburg Votes when he committed the crime, according to acting United States Attorney Rick A. Mountcastle.

Harrisonburg Votes is a political organization affiliated with the Democratic Party.

Beyond the observation that requiring voters to present a photo identification just makes common sense there are two other points there. First, a US Attorney actually prosecuted the case. For too long the Department of Justice has ignored vote fraud and, in the case of the NBPP thugs in Philadelphia, outright voter intimidation so long as the “right” people are doing it. The second point is that Virginia Governor and long-time Clinton bag man, Terry McAuliffe vetoed a bill which would have triggered an audit of voter rolls whenever the number of registered voters in a county exceeded the number of eligible voters–a situation that exists in eight Virginia counties.