This is scary stuff.

CNN (it’s an apple, no, it’s a banana, no, it’s a kumquat) is reporting that at a meeting with President Trump, deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein tried to get President Trump to obstruct an investigation.

As you know, the House Intelligence Committee had been demanding documents and access to witnesses in the FBI and the Justice Department. This issue finally came to a head when Rosenstein and FBI director Christopher Wray tried an end-run on Devin Nunes to House Speaker Paul Ryan and were told to give what was necessary or face the contempt of Congress citations Nunes had promised them.

This meeting took place while Rosenstein was trying to obstruct Nunes’ investigation and he wanted Trump’s help:

Seven months later, Rosenstein made his pitch in the December meeting with the President, asking for White House backing as the Justice Department sought to deny access to sensitive documents demanded by Nunes, who has spent months pursuing claims of surveillance abuses by the FBI and the Justice Department against the Trump campaign.

Now this sounds profoundly silly, doesn’t it? Why? Because it is. But it is no less silly or, less credible, than any other story you’re going to read about Trump or Nunes or anyone else of significance obstructing justice.