Florida gubernatorial candidate U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis speaks to supporters at a rally Wednesday, July 18, 2018, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

 

Republican Representative and victor in Tuesday’s GOP primary for the Florida gubernatorial race didn’t have long to wait before being labeled racist.

Fresh off his victory in the Florida Republican gubernatorial primary, Rep. Ron DeSantis said Wednesday that voters would “monkey this up” if they elected his African-American Democratic opponent, Andrew Gillum, to be governor, immediately drawing accusations of racism.

Calling Gillum “an articulate spokesman” for the far left, DeSantis said during an interview on Fox News when asked about his opponent, “The last thing we need to do is to monkey this up by trying to embrace a socialist agenda with huge tax increases and bankrupting the state.”

To say that progressives pounced is like saying King Kong stepped off the Empire State Building…oops, that was an ape reference, my bad.

And you have the Vichy wing of the GOP chiming in:

And this total bullsh** from a “neutral” political observer:

What you are seeing here is a concerted effort to regenerate the “Macaca” nonsense that derailed George Allen’s campaign for Virginia senator in 2008. The story being peddled here only makes sense if you believe that DeSantis thinks he can win Florida without any crossover vote, without any black vote, and without a lot of GOP votes. Why are they doing this, other than this is the way GOP candidates are treated by our supposedly unbiased media?

Accusations bubbled after McCain aired a campaign ad referring to then-opponent Barack Obama as a celebrity. Following its release, The New York Times editorial board promptly responded calling it a “racially tinged attack” since the ad juxtaposed Obama with young white celebrities.

Other media outlets quickly followed suit: Bill Press, co-host of CNN’s Crossfire, accused the ad of being “deliberately and deceptively racist;” MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann said it was “almost subliminal racism” and Talking Points Memo co-founder Josh Marshall contended that McCain is “pushing the caricature of Obama as a uppity young black man whose presumptuousness is displayed not only in taking on airs above his station but also in a taste for young white women,” reported Politico. Ezra Klein, co-founder of Vox, also accused McCain of “running crypto-racist ads” during his campaign.

What started out as a drip metastasized into full-blown accusations of promulgating a racist agenda.

“What I’m seeing reminds me too much of another destructive period in American history,” Georgia Rep. John Lewis said only two months after the “Celeb” ad aired. “[The campaign is] sowing the seeds of hatred and division, and there is no need for this hostility in our political discourse.”

Lewis further signified McCain was complicit in racial segregation, comparing him to the former governor of Alabama and segregationist George Wallace.

“George Wallace never threw a bomb,” Lewis continued. “He never fired a gun, but he created the climate and the conditions that encouraged vicious attacks against innocent Americans who were simply trying to exercise their constitutional rights.”

CNN Anchor Don Lemon implied similar sentiments, telling his followers on Twitter that “the question is” if the McCain campaign was “inciting hate and hate speech.”

The Democrat winner, Andrew Gillum, was a surprise winner in a three-person race. The favorite was Bob Graham’s daughter, Florida representative Gwen Graham. When Gillum won, not only were the Democrats saddled with a profoundly socialist candidate but a deeply corrupt one who is apparently a subject of an FBI investigation.

Everyone is entitled to believe what they wish here. If you dislike DeSantis because he is a Trump ally, then I’m sure the racial slur allegation resonates with you and fits nicely in your worldview. For my part, I’m with Townhall colleague Kurt Schlichter: