screengrab fromhttps://twitter.com/SenTedCruz/status/1092847366351269888

When Mueller’s team of Democrats were compiling the report of the collusion hoax investigation, they helpfully wrote a synopsis and volume summaries which they intended to become the public take on the investigation and a way of letting them control the narrative and, with the help of the Attorney General, violate one of the cardinal ethical (I wet myself just a little bit laughing as I wrote that) strictures of prosecutors: you don’t slime innocent people. (Read Robert Mueller’s Letter Reveals the Secret Agenda Behind His Report and Why He’s Upset With Bill Barr for details.) Barr issued his own “just the fact, ma’am” summary that basically controlled the terms of the public discussion from March 24 until April 18 when the Mueller report was released.

Yesterday, Attorney General Bill Barr was raked over the coals by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee over his four-page summary of the Mueller report and Mueller’s whiny-little-girl letter complaining about his own meisterwerk not having been used.

The Democrats seized upon Mueller’s letter as being evidence of some kind of nefarious plot to hide the true conclusions of the report. The whole thing was stupid in the extreme. Not only do we have the report to read ourselves, rendering Barr’s memo and Mueller’s letter superfluous, but the summaries that Mueller was so hot-and-bothered about not being released were included in the report. In short, if you want to read what Mueller’s team wrote, it is readily available. If you want to ignore what Barr wrote, the report is there.

Yesterday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, the guy who helped Beto O’Rourke burn through nearly $80 million in Democrat cash, summarized the state of play:

CRUZ: The principle attack that the Democratic senators have marshaled upon you concerns this March 27th letter from Robert Mueller and it’s an attack I want people to understand and just how revealing it is. This is their whole argument. They ain’t got nothing.

So their argument is as follows, and let me see if I understand it correctly. You initially, when you received the Mueller report, released to Congress and the public a four-page summary of the conclusions. Then, on March 27th, Mr. Mueller asked you to release an additional 19-pages, an introduction and summary that he had drafted. And, indeed, in the letter, what he says is ‘I am requesting that you provide these materials to Congress and authorize their public release at this time.’ And the reason he says it is to fully capture the context, nature and substance of the office’s working conclusion.”

Two weeks later, you release 448 pages, the entire report, which includes those 19 pages. Do I have that timeline correct?

BARR: That’s correct.

CRUZ: Their entire argument is ‘General Barr, you suppressed the 19 pages that are entirely public, that we have, that we can read, that they know every word of it.’ And their complaint is that it was delayed a few weeks.

If that is their argument, I have to say, that is an exceptionally weak argument. Because, if you’re hiding something, I’ll tell you right now, General Barr, you’re doing a very lousy job of hiding it. Because the thing they’re suggesting you hid you released, you released to Congress and the American people.