Independent investigative journalist has been on the forefront of breaking news stories about Spygate and the Deep State coup over the past few years. He was a relatively obscure editorialist and regular columnist at The Hill, an outlet noted for conveying Deep State-oriented news and commentary. Before that he was editor-in-chief for The Washington Times. Either he was able to develop useful insider sources at DoJ and the FBI and in the intelligence community, or those sources sought him out as a means of disclosing the various misdeeds he reported. One never knows how that works, as Washington DC seems to have a culture of leaks – for good and for evil.

At any rate, Solomon has also now become a regular contributor to Fox News – particularly on Sean Hannity’s show – and has leveraged his fame into an independent gig running a new media outlet, JustTheNews, which is aimed at providing straight news without the biased commentary that has overcome the legacy media/corporate media over the past few years. That’s actually what we desperately need, as the legacy media have disgraced themselves with their incessant anti-Trump vitriol and have failed in their constitutional responsibility to operate as an “independent press” free of allegiances and obligations to special interests.

Solomon also continues to break news on FISAgate, Spygate, and related topics on a regular basis, courtesy of his various sources. One of those reports from last week examined recently-released FBI documents that showed the FBI knew in early 2017 that there was no Trump campaign collusion with Russia:

James Comey’s G-men had substantially debunked the theory that Donald Trump’s campaign conspired with Moscow by the time the 45th president was settling into the Oval Office, according to declassified memos, court filings and interviews.

And that means a nascent presidency and an entire nation were put through two more years of lacerating debate over an issue that was mostly resolved in January 2017 inside the bureau’s own evidence files. The proof is now sitting in plain view.

In rapid fire sequence in January 2017, U.S. officials:

  • received multiple warnings about the credibility of informant Christopher Steele and his dossier;

  • affirmed key targets of the FBI counterintelligence investigation made exculpatory statements denying collusion to undercover sources;

  • concluded retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn, Trump’s first national security adviser, was not engaged in collusion with the Russians.

Solomon was interviewed by Lou Dobbs about that story and what is ahead in terms of new revelations and the probably consequences for those involved in the criminality. Here is some of that Q&A:

Dobbs: You are confirming that less than two weeks into the Trump presidency, they should have known that Flynn wasn’t guilty because they’d already concluded that … and that he wasn’t working as an agent of Russia … that the Steele dossier was a fraud and a manufactured bunch of nonsense … and that FBI targets like Carter Page and Papadopoulos made exculpatory statements, and yet it rolled on.

Solomon: Between January 7th and January 30th of 2017 – President Trump had only served 10 days in office at that point – the entire underpinnings of the Russia collusion case were completely disproven. They knew that the Steele dossier had been disowned by its primary source. They knew that the primary targets they had been monitoring had made statements that undercut the main allegations that they were investigating, and then on January 30th, the FBI writes a memo to the Justice Dept stating flatly “Mike Flynn is not an agent of Russia.” That was what they were looking at at that moment – all of it feel apart – and yet we ended up with another two years and three months of investigations. It’s an outrage when people look at these documents.

Dobbs: And the interview records – the 302s – have disappeared. They can’t be found, or at least they won’t be found.

Solomon: That’s a very suspicious thing. The FBI keeps very good records, except in the case of Mike Flynn’s one interview. That should also trouble us all just like the altered document that they did on Carter Page. The FBI did not act like the FBI here. They acted like a band of criminals in some of the activities they engaged in.

Dobbs: When you look at the Inspector General’s report which documents 17 outright lies by the FBI, you wonder which is the real FBI.

Solomon: There was a small group of people that hijacked this process, and we will find that they did it ultimately for political purposes, but it’s not the FBI only. I’m going to have a story next week on what senior Justice Dept officials were telling Bob Mueller a few months later after the case fell apart – how concerned they were about the FBI’s conduct. I’m going to break that story next week. You will not believe the comments that senior Justice officials were saying about the FBI’s conduct. Sadly, they didn’t stop them, but they knew what was going on was wrong.

Dobbs: I know that you are very much … confident in Attorney General William Barr and John Durham, the US attorney who he assigned to investigate the investigators of Spygate. But here we are more than a year later. There isn’t a work product. There isn’t a conclusion, and that has also been part of what has been the “new FBI.” Truth goes there to die, and reports? We wait patiently, and we’re told that they can’t comment because they’re carrying out an investigation and haven’t filed a report. It looks like subterfuge – a straight-forward [process] that allows them not to comment and not to ever deliver the truth.

Solomon: I’ve done a lot of reporting in this area, and here are the three things I hear. There has been an exhaustive investigation. There are bombshell new revelations that will be coming out, particularly about how early the effort to spy on Trump and maybe other Republicans was. I think you’re going to see it go back to December of 2015, perhaps. I think there are going to be new revelations … new discipline … new shaming of the people that oversaw this. I don’t there will be a lot of indictments. There may be some more firings. There may be one or two indictments, but we’re going to get some accountability. I do think that John Durham’s going to have a nice novel when he’s done here. We’re going to learn a lot more, and learning and exposing it hopefully will be one incentive not to do it again. But I think if people are looking for a lot of prosecutions, I think they will be disappointed.

Dobbs: Put me down as disappointed because if you can do what these politically-corrupt officials of the FBI and Justice Dept did – and get away with it – the American people have been fundamentally betrayed by also the investigators who are investigating the investigators.

End of the Q&A. Put me down as disappointed, too, if what Solomon predicts is the final outcome of the Durham investigation! These people were part of a political motivated seditious conspiracy if there ever has been one in the United States, and they need to be indicted and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

There is more involved here than just upholding the rule of law. There is also the concept of deterrence of future crimes that is equally important. These people cannot be allowed to simply walk away from this without legal accountability, as that eventuality would simply embolden others to take similar actions in the future, knowing that they too would be risking very little to potentially gain very much by their sedition. That is not the kind of country in which I want to live.

Enough of the two-tiered justice system in America! Enough of the “protecting of the institutions” as primary consideration, as opposed to doing the real law enforcement job of exposing the criminality within the ranks of the FBI and Justice Department! We’ve GOT to have accountability, or the corruption will seep into every corner of law enforcement in the land over time. The insufferable and sanctimonious Comey, McCabe, Strzok, Page, and the rest need to be dealt with harshly. Call your congressman and demand it.

The end.

Stu Cvrk
Stu Cvrk served 30 years in the US Navy in a variety of active and reserve capacities, with considerable operational experience in the Middle East and the Western Pacific. An oceanographer and systems analyst through education and experience, Stu is a graduate of the US Naval Academy where he received a classical liberal education which serves as the key foundation for his political commentary. He threads daily on Twitter on a wide range of political, military, foreign policy, government, economics, and world affairs topics.
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