OH… I’m all over this.

David Plouffe, former campaign manager for President Obama, is playing amateur psychologist and has made a diagnosis of whatever is going on in Donald Trump’s brain.

“I mean, basically, we have a psychopath running for president,” Plouffe told NBC. “I mean, he meets the clinical definition, okay?”

Asked by NBC’s Chuck Todd whether it was fair for someone without a degree in psychology to diagnose someone’s mental state on air, Plouffe doubled down.

“Listen, the grandiose notion of self-worth, pathological lying, lack of empathy and remorse,” Plouffe said on “Meet the Press.” Hillary Clinton and President Obama has all been accused at various points of harboring each of these characteristics.

“I don’t have a degree in psychology, Plouffe said. But here it is: Chuck, basically, the race ends today. I think Hillary Clinton is guaranteed at least 269 electoral votes — think about that. Because Virginia and Colorado, both campaigns I think believe are put away.”

You’re in luck, David. I do have a degree in Psychology, so let me take a stab at it.

To be a psychopath, a person falls into a Cluster B personality disorder. Psychopathy is a subgenre of the Antisocial Personality Disorder, which, in turn, falls under the Cluster B disorders.

Does that mean Trump is a psychopath?

Not necessarily. Psychopaths become master manipulators and charmers. They can mimic “normal” behavior, even if they don’t necessarily feel it.

Trump hasn’t been able to control himself or act normal from the first day he announced.

If Trump is to be diagnosed with anything, it is another Cluster B disorder.

Narcissistic Personality Disorder is marked by those who have an exaggerated sense of self-importance, and a desire to become more important by amassing more and more successes.

They have to have all eyes on them, at all times, and are extremely sensitive to criticism or failure.

Sound familiar?

They exhibit extreme mood swings, between their personal preening and admiration of themselves, and feeling insecure and “picked on.” They also tend to take advantage of those who are close to them.

I am absolutely sure Trump has some sort of disorder, but the media is not the place to diagnose it, and unfortunately, Trump is surprisingly short of principled people in his circle.

Plouffe, however, amateur psychologist as he is, may have saved us a lot of trouble, had he been as observant and concerned a few years back, with the charming narcissist, possibly psychopathic problem that has so painstakingly dismantled our republic over the past eight years.

After all, he helped him get there.