The expected, collective howls of pain and outrage are emanating from the usual, liberal corners of our society, in response to President Trump’s (not Muslim) travel ban.

Along with the celebrity caterwauling at Sunday night’s Screen Actors Guild Awards show, CEOs from some of the top industries in the nation are having their say.

To date, executives from Apple, Airbnb, Tesla, Microsoft, Uber, and Netflix have all expressed their concern over the policy.

Now add Google to the list.

From USA Today:

The search-engine giant has created a $2 million crisis fund that can be matched with up to $2 million in donations from employees, totaling $4 million, for four organizations: the American Civil Liberties Union, Immigrant Legal Resource Center, International Rescue Committee and UNHCR. It is Google’s largest crisis campaign ever.

Separately, company executives are also giving money individually to the cause.

Google CEO, Sundar Pichai has pointed out that at least 187 Google employees would be affected by the order.

“We’re concerned about the impact of this order and any proposals that could impose restrictions on Googlers and their families, or that could create barriers to bringing great talent to the U.S.,” Google said in a statement. “We’ll continue to make our views on these issues known to leaders in Washington and elsewhere.”

The president’s executive order suspends the entry of all refugees to the United States for 120 days, halts the admission of refugees from Syria indefinitely and bars entry for three months to residents from the predominantly Muslim countries of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen.

Other companies are making their own moves in response to the order.

Starbucks says they will hire 10,000 refugees, worldwide, over the next 5 years, in response.

Airbnb have pledged to find temporary lodging for any refugees affected by the order.

In an email sent to employees Saturday night, Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky wrote that Trump’s policy was one, “I profoundly disagree with, and it is a direct obstacle to our mission at Airbnb.”

“Barring refugees and people who are not a threat from entering America simply because they are from a certain country is not right, and we must stand with those who are affected. The doors to America shall remain open, and any that are locked will not be for long,” he wrote on the note, which was posted on the company site on Sunday.

They’re working with individuals and relief organizations to try and find people who need housing.

And that is completely within their rights to do.

If you must launch a protest, I have a lot more respect for those willing to put their money where their mouths are and put their companies on the line, than to deal with the ranters, ravers, and perpetually aggrieved that crowd airport terminals, or chain themselves to security checkpoints, in an attempt to ruin everyone’s day who may not share their views.