The concerns and commentary from both sides of the aisle, in regards to President Trump’s travel ban on refugees from seven Muslim countries continues.

Over the weekend, the nation witnessed chaos and protests, after Trump’s signing of an executive order barred entry for some refugees who were already arriving at airports around the country.

The decision by a federal judge out of New York put a halt some several key portions of the order, allowing for those who were still being detained to enter.

Of those who have expressed their concerns, the latest comments come from Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Tim Scott (R-S.C.).

“We are uneasy about the potential impact of these measures on our military and our diplomatic personnel abroad, as well as those who put their lives on the line to work with us,” the two wrote in a statement.

“We are both committed to doing what we must to keep America safe. We are equally committed to the defense of religious liberty and our tradition of providing refuge to those fleeing persecution.”

In framing their unease, the two suggested that they realize a lot of what is being reported about the order isn’t fully correct, but they also feel that the way the order was put into effect caused the confusion.

Rubio and Scott said they are looking for clarity on the changes being made to the Visa Waiver program, which they called “critical to the economies in our respective states.”

 

The two added they are guided by their belief that “when we stand before our Creator to face judgment, He will say that ‘to the extent that you did it to one of these brothers of Mine, even the least of them, you did it to Me.’ ”

“That is why we intend to do all we can to both keep America safe, and keep America special.”

And that’s about as gracious of an answer as can be given, and one that resonates with me, actually.

The two join fellow Republican Senators John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Ben Sasse, Jeff Flake, Orrin Hatch, Rob Portman, Susan Collins, and Representatives Justin Amash, Barbara Comstock, and Charlie Dent in expressing their concerns over how the order was written, and ultimately implemented.