“Unite the Right” was billed as a march to protest the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue. You would think that there would be some conversation about that, somewhere along the way.

According to the Vice News correspondent embedded with the group (as shown in the video I talked about last week, here), preserving a piece of American history was the furthest thing from their minds.

So what was on their minds, if not Robert E. Lee?

Jews.

“Once they started marching, they didn’t talk about Robert E. Lee being a brilliant military tactician. They chanted about Jews. Like, they wanted to be menacing. It’s not an accident,” Elle Reeve told CBS News’ John Dickerson on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” 

In that respect, at least, they have something in common with the counter-protesters and the Antifa crowds that are raging against anything that resembles American history, these days: They don’t care about the statues, either. They’re just a convenient excuse.

Another point Reeve brought up is that the groups there for the rally aren’t real life “bros.”

“These guys didn’t live together, hang out together. They just swarmed together online. And so this is a movement to hold physical space,” she continued.

“They’ve taken tactics from left wing organizers and show that they’re strong and they have camaraderie. And they also are focusing on what they call aesthetics. They want to look middle class, successful, good looking. They don’t want to look like the old, as they called it, white trash racist of the old times,” she said.

That would explain the white Polo shirts and khakis. They wanted to appear like a Gentlemen’s Auxiliary, or something.

Well, the Jaycees they are not.

What we’ve seen, as a result of the filth they brought to Charlottesville and the subsequent loss of life, is that any meaningful discussion about the importance of maintaining our nation’s heritage – every part of it – has been lost.

They gave Antifa and every other leftist group wiggle room to claim the high ground. Anybody who might be thinking about defending some of those time-worn monuments to the southern side of the war between the states will have to wade neck-deep through a cesspool of liberal rage and accusations of racism.

Not that anyone not a liberal would ever be given the benefit of the doubt, anyway.

The event in Charlottesville, which resulted in multiple injuries and one death has set off a chain reaction, with Antifa crowds (See: Communists and assorted agitators) disrupting a free speech rally in Boston on Saturday, and destroying a 100-year old Confederate monument in Durham, North Carolina earlier in the week.