Wow. I’m sure you all feel better, now.

The former worst U.S. president ever Jimmy Carter is ready to suit up and get in the game.

Speaking with Maureen Dowd, of the New York Times, Carter said that if Trump wanted, he’d travel to North Korea to serve as a diplomatic envoy, and attempt to work out some sort of peace deal.

The 93-year old Democrat said:

 “I would go, yes,” Carter said. He pointed to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s unpredictability as a major reason why diplomacy was so necessary.

“I’m afraid, too, of a situation,” he continues. “I don’t know what they’ll do. Because they want to save their regime. And we greatly overestimate China’s influence on North Korea. Particularly to Kim Jong-un. He’s never, so far as I know, been to China.”

So far, pressure and other diplomatic means have resolved exactly zilch with the rogue nation. Neither the Trump administration, nor the Obama administration before has been able to convince them to curb their nuclear ambitions. They’ve conducted several major missile tests and remain defiant.

“I think he’s now got advanced nuclear weaponry that can destroy the Korean Peninsula and Japan, and some of our outlying territories in the Pacific, maybe even our mainland,” Carter said.

Carter is apparently serious about going, as well. He’s already reached out to national security adviser H.R. McMaster.

“I told him that I was available if they ever need me,” Carter told the paper.

No… I mean he really wants to go to North Korea.

A South Korean newspaper had reported weeks ago that Carter was ready to sit down with Kim Jong-un and hash out a truce.

“Should former President Carter be able to visit North Korea, he would like to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and discuss a peace treaty between the United States and the North and a complete denuclearization of North Korea,” a University of Georgia professor who spoke with Carter told the paper.

It’s nice of him to offer to help, but at 93, maybe he should just enjoy his retirement?

Besides, the last time Carter tried out his diplomatic finesse, 52 Americans got an extended stay in the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.