White House aide Stephen Miller – who, really, just looks like an obnoxious guy – made a Sunday appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union” with Jake Tapper.

Yeah. It didn’t go well.

Miller was brought on to defend some of President Trump’s statements, but it became clear pretty early on that he was sent to the network with a mission of playing court jester and administration fool on live TV.

The interview was rocky, from the start. And painful.

As Tapper attempted to get through a line of straight questioning, Miller lurched into a babbling filibuster, avoiding anything resembling replies, and opting to simply use the annoyingly childish vernacular of the Trump Twitter feed to describe CNN.

Tapper got fed up (and I don’t blame him).

Miller spent a good portion of the interview defending Trump and bashing the network, and Tapper eventually cut him off, suggesting Trump was the only viewer Miller cared about.

“I think I’ve wasted enough of my viewers’ time. Thank you, Stephen,” Tapper added as he ended the interview.

Tapper was right, of course. I’m going to say it’s a very safe bet that Miller was briefed before the appearance to be as combative and uncooperative as possible, no matter what the questions.

Shutting down the [non]interview was the best move, and you’d think that would be the end of it.

But it wasn’t.

Miller had been instructed on how to behave during the interview, but he apparently wasn’t sure of what to do in the event the interview was stopped early, so he just decided to hang around.

Yup. Stephen Miller attempted a sit-in on the CNN set, or something equally idiotic.

Miller was asked to leave the set multiple times but refused to leave, after which he was escorted out by security, a CNN employee confirmed to The Hill.

There are several takeaways here.

For starters, Trump’s statements are so awful that they can’t be reasonably defended by his staff.

And two, he’s surrounded himself with likewise petulant jerks.

Of course, Trump was watching to make sure his orders to disrupt the show were carried out, and giddily tweeted out (more of his “Executive time”) that Tapper was “destroyed” during the interview.

Just a point of clarity: Tapper was not destroyed. He was the obvious adult in the room. He gave Miller an opportunity to speak in defense of his boss with clarity, but when it became clear he couldn’t do that, Tapper shut it down.

In the end, Miller was escorted off the property like a common thug.

And this is where we are in our political discourse.

How, exactly, is this better?