There are even more revelations coming from newly released text messages between FBI agent Peter Strzok and his mistress, FBI attorney Lisa Page.

As I pointed out earlier, the text messages released Tuesday by Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman Ron Johnson showed a Strzok who was waffling about whether to even accept the assignment with special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe. He shared with Page that he doubted anything would come of it, and he had to make a decision about which way to take his career.

Ultimately, he chose to accept a position with the investigation.

 In a text to Lisa Page, the top FBI lawyer and his mistress, he also called the Russia probe historic.

At 12:13 am on May 19, two days after Mueller was appointed to head the investigation, Strzok indicates that initially he didn’t want to take a position on the probe. “My answer is no way,” he texted Page, according to one of several texts provided to the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee headed by Wisconsin Republican Ron Johnson.

“And then I think…” he tests, “A case which will be in the history books.”

He concluded that while “a million” people simply have staff jobs in the agency, “this is a chance to DO. In maybe the most important case of our lives.”

He’s right. It’s a big case. It has commanded headlines, drawn a dividing line between Republicans and conservatives, and let’s be honest: The idea of an American presidential candidate possibly conspiring with a hostile foreign government is a big deal.

Strzok seemed to be talking himself into taking the assignment, even as Page was attempting to talk him out of it.

While he didn’t feel there would be any evidence of collusion, however, it didn’t stop him from wondering if there could be any other outcomes.

As the duo text well past midnight, he wrote at 12:41 a.m., “An investigation leading to impeachment?”

The rest is a lot of Strzok turning on the charm and lavishing his mistress with praise. It’s kind of an exercise in how lawyers and legal people woo each other, I think.

Eventually, Page suggested they should stop talking about career goals, the investigation, and whatever that sweet talk was they were passing back and forth.

Is it proof of an insidious plot or a secret society within the FBI, as Trump’s babbling gimp, Sean Hannity has been pushing to the redcapper masses?

Hardly.

It’s the kind of fevered conversations that go on when two people know they’re entangled in a relationship that is illicit. One had a distaste for Trump and the other fed into it, to heighten the connection.

Strzok may very well be right that there’s no “there, there.” A solid look at the texts available and an ounce of insight into human nature, however, puts a stake in the heart of all the silly conspiracy theories against the dignity of the FBI.

You can read the texts released today here.