So earlier this week, former Trump aide Sam Nunberg gave the most spectacular performance, with a series of call-ins and appearances on cable news programs.

With each call or appearance, he became more erratic and defiant, claiming that he would not comply with a subpoena to testify or turn over emails in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

In his rambling appearances, he said that he felt Trump had done something, but he couldn’t be sure.

He called the investigation a “witch hunt,” and said he thought it would be funny if they arrested him.

By Friday, the day of his scheduled appearance with Mueller’s team, he’d apparently sobered up.

He showed up for his testimony, and in a Saturday interview, he reflected anew on his thoughts regarding the investigation.

“No, I don’t think it’s a witch hunt. There’s a lot there, and that’s the sad truth,” Nunberg told ABC News in an interview broadcast Saturday, a day after he answered a subpoena by Mueller’s team to testify before a federal grand jury on his time in the campaign.

Of what counts as “a lot there,” he doesn’t feel it leads back to Trump.

So who is he worried about?

After his testimony, Nunberg said he’s “very worried” about Roger Stone, a longtime Republican strategist who informally advised Trump during the early stages of the campaign. “He’s certainly at least the subject of this investigation, in the very least he’s a subject.”

Possible.

As mentioned, Stone’s involvement with Trump’s campaign was informal, or at least, behind the scenes. His friendship with Trump runs back much further.

Stone is believed to have some knowledge of the hacked and leaked DNC emails. It is believed that he was in contact with a Russian hacker that went by the name Guccifer 2.0, as well as Julian Assange, of WikiLeaks.

WikiLeaks is widely believed to be non-state actors, working on behalf of the Kremlin.

Stone and Nunberg are friends, and many felt Nunberg seemed concerned about his friend during his rantings.

In his Saturday interview, he explained that his earlier complaints had to do with the tight time frame he felt Mueller had put on him. Mueller was seeking emails between Nunberg and other Trump team members that went back to 2015 and could possibly number in the thousands.

“People say I had a meltdown on TV, I melted TV down that day,” he told ABC News. “I was going to always comply with arriving today. I’m an attorney, that’s the first thing, and this is my duty as an American, to do this whether I like it or not.”

That is a much more rational view, and you have to wonder how much of it is a result of his lawyers reaming him out, privately?