Apparently, they’re not calling them UFOs, anymore. Now the term is UAP – Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon.

I guess that seems more rational, like, maybe there’s a logical explanation for the things they’re seeing, but can’t put a name to.

In 2017, we found that the Pentagon had a secretive $22 million project underway, for the purpose of exploring the possibility of UFOs (excuse me… UAP).

The project was the baby of Senator Harry Reid, but had the support of the Pentagon, and aerial footage of…something… from the Air Force to back it up. In fact, there were three videos.

Now, there’s more something.

The New York Post is reporting on newly released footage from 2015, bringing into question, once again, if there really is a need for research into “visitors” from places far, far away.

The 2-minute video clip was shot somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean by a US Navy F/A 18 jet flying at 25,000 feet.

You can see a small, bright object moving swiftly across the surface of the ocean, as the pilot and a second officer marvel over what they’re seeing.

“What the f— is that thing?” shouted the pilot in the video posted online by the To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, a private research company.

“Oh my gosh dude!” exclaimed the jet’s weapons systems officer.

My gosh, indeed.

So with a small, lightly-funded, secretive Pentagon version of the “X-Files” out there, should there be more engagement in studying these sightings?

Christopher Mellon believes so.

Mellon is a former defense official with the Clinton and second Bush administration, and now works as an advisor to the To the Stars Academy.

In a Washington Post op-ed, Mellon reasoned that if the origin of these aircraft is a mystery, “so is the paralysis of the US government in the face of such evidence.”

Mellon believes that one of several things is going on:

He wondered if the US has been “technologically leap-frogged by Russia or China” or might these videos “be evidence of some alien civilization. Unfortunately, we have no idea, because we aren’t even seeking answers.”

Mellon would like to see more serious investigation put into these sightings, and I’m not prepared to say he’s wrong. At this point, however, they’re just sightings. They’re also (to the best of the public’s knowledge) sporadic events, rather than something that is common enough to raise the red flags.