President Trump had a flailing, spitting hissy fit on Twitter Saturday night.

I wonder why?

Well, this may be a clue. Fresh on the heels of his hit job on Andrew McCabe, his legal team was presented with questions from special counsel Robert Mueller.

That may also explain Trump’s lawyer, John Dowd, issuing a statement that the time was right to shut down Mueller’s investigation – a statement he initially suggested was on behalf of his client, the president.

It all seems a little convenient, right?

The New York Times reported Saturday that the questions were a sort of starting point for Mueller, whose team is working to negotiate an interview with Trump as part of the investigation into Russia’s role in the 2016 election.

It was after his legal team received the questions that Trump launched into a series of tweets, in which he denied that his campaign coordinated with Moscow during the 2016 election and lambasted Mueller’s investigation as unnecessary.

Dowd later backpedaled and said his statement wasn’t necessarily on his client’s behalf. That, of course, is a curious retraction. Either he’s speaking on behalf of his client, or he is not.

The piece from the NY Times goes on to suggest that Trump’s legal team (Dowd and Jay Sekulow) was caught off guard by reports that the president had spoken with attorney Emmet Flood, considering him to be the go-between with Mueller’s team.

Another report was that Trump was considering replacing White House counsel Don McGahn with Flood.

Either way, Dowd and Sekulow seem to be learning a lesson about letting “Trump be Trump.” He likes doing things on his own and that makes him a nightmare as a client.

There’s no word yet on what those questions were that Mueller submitted to Trump’s team, but they must have been jarring to elicit such a testy response.

It’s probably a safe bet to say that the questions submitted are actually the safe ones. If Trump agrees to sit with Mueller – something his lawyers do NOT want to happen – I imagine there will be a lot of old man sweat (and other bodily fluids) left in the room.