Racism Is Not Privilege Plus Prejudice. Racism Is Racism

For the better part of the last decade, I’ve heard this odd take on racism that defies all logic.

The belief, largely held by the social justice community, is that racism is only racism if the person being racist is of a race that holds institutional power. This is an elegant way of saying that only white people can be racist.

This means that if a black, Hispanic, Native American or Middle Eastern person is being racist against white people, then it cannot be considered racism because this race does not hold any institutional power in the United States or the western world for that matter.

Oddly enough, this rule does not extend to any country where other races hold institutional power. For instance, in South Africa, white farmers were more or less driven from their homes due to their skin color and western SJWs refused to label this as racism due to the fact that the white race is currently at the top of the global power list.

I don’t think I need to highlight that this is a naked attempt at pardoning any racism against white people from the social justice community, which has a horrible track record of hypocrisy. Since the social justice community absolutely refuses to be anything but hateful and prejudiced against those it professes to hate, it has to come up with creative ways to make itself innocent of the very crimes it condemns other races for committing while committing those crimes themselves.

The truth is, racism is racism. It’s disdain for someone else simply because of their skin color, and no amount of verbal and mental gymnastics can change that fact.

What’s more, not only is it shallow reasoning for disliking anyone, it doesn’t exactly define who they are. For instance, a black student from a well-to-do University is far better off than the white person working the counter at a local supermarket in an attempt to make ends meet. It would be silly to say that the white grocer is higher up on the societal food chain than the black student who is most likely there because money was given to her either from the state by various grants that the white grocer could never dream to apply for, or possibly even her parents who very well may be wealthy and influential.

People come from all walks of life, no matter what color they are. Breaking people down to their skin color dismisses them and their story entirely. Yet, too many are encouraged to operate under the assumption that one’s skin color defines their entire identity. You see this quite a bit at Universities where shallow reasoning is drilled into the heads of students.

Take, for instance, videos like the one that recently went viral of a University of Virginia Student telling white students to leave the multicultural building because it’s not their space and they’re making students of color uncomfortable…

This woman had no idea who she was talking to, or what their stories were. She only saw their skin color and acted accordingly. What’s worse, she boiled her own presence down to her skin color and acted out against those of white skin colors without considering anything more about herself.

What this girl exhibited was racism in its grimiest form, yet she’s been convinced by a social justice driven culture that what she did was for the sake of “justice.” She truly believed that she was reclaiming space and that the white students in the building were intruding unjustly upon it.

Racism isn’t something one is born with. It has to be taught, and this poor woman was taught by some very nasty people that it’s her vs other people who lack melanin. This is an awful way to go through life. It’s hollow and hateful. It leaves no room for any healing that may need to take place and it closes down opportunities for communication and coming together.

However, for the social justice community, coming together was never the goal. The goal is ultimately subjugation, separation, and punishment.

Social justice is, without a doubt, racism and bigotry wearing a mask of justice.

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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