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Photo from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. (Courtesy of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement)

 

Alex Villanueva, Sheriff of Los Angeles County, is a walking contradiction. If you don’t like a position he’s taken on almost anything, just wait a few hours or days or months and it will likely change. (Just don’t expect a change in his position on law-abiding civilians owning guns or obtaining a concealed carry permit.)

Lately, his changes in position seem to have more to do with sticking it to the County Board of Supervisors than any intellectual shift based on new information or a desire to protect the public or his deputies.

Take his tweets Tuesday, for instance, after a Board of Supervisors meeting in which how to address budget shortfalls was a topic on the agenda. The Board of Supervisors is considering what to do with the dilapidated and overcrowded Men’s Central Jail, which Villanueva agrees needs to either be gutted and renovated or replaced, but Villanueva twisted the issue to fit his own petty and self-contradictory agenda.

Villanueva said:

The @LACountyBOS believes the most vulnerable@CountyofLA population are criminal offenders. I believe our most vulnerable are the victims of crime. With the closure of Men’s Central Jail, the @LASDHQ will have less capacity to house @CountyofLAs most violent offenders. In our custody today, we have thousands of serious criminal offenders.

Oh, is that what you believe, Sheriff? That wasn’t evident when you chose to release 5,000 inmates at the outset of the Wuhan flu pandemic with no quarantine measures or contact tracing procedures in place and when you instructed your deputies to not bring criminals to the jail unless they’d committed a felony.

That belief really wasn’t evident, Sheriff, just a few weeks ago when you said that giving information about criminal illegal aliens in your jails amounted to “selling out the undocumented inmates” and that funding the county received via State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) grants was “Trump blood money.”

During a Facebook Live town hall Villanueva said:

From 2005 until last year, 2018, the County of Los Angeles received a total of $122 million in SCAAP grant funds. That is, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program. What they had to do to receive these funds is they had to sell out the undocumented inmates in the county jail system, all of their information, they had to provide it to the federal government, to ICE, and in the last four – since 2017, to the Trump administration.

Villanueva then characterized the grant funding as a “cash cow” for the Board of Supervisors and his predecessors. He cast himself as the hero riding in to save these poor “undocumented inmates” from this violation of their rights, saying that he didn’t know about the grant when he ran for Sheriff (even though he’d been employed by the department for DECADES), and that when he found out about it he refused to apply for the next fiscal year. Never mind that a white paper released in preparation for SCAAP’s implementation found that 17 percent of inmates in the LA County Jail were deportable (criminal) aliens and that the grants offset or completely pay for the county’s cost to house those inmates.

He’s not the sharpest tool in the shed.

And a bonus #ProTip: When you’re bitching about budget cuts, it’s best not to advertise that you walked away from funding.

Ah, but Villanueva thinks he can poke at Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, who’s running for LA City Council, on this issue. He continued:

So let’s have the LA city residents in … the district that Mark Ridley–Thomas is campaigning to switch seats, maybe he can explain that to his potential future constituents why was he accepting blood money from the Trump administration? That’s a lot of money. Holy moly. That’s probably upwards of $80 million that Mr. Mark Ridley-Thomas was okay from receiving in exchange for selling out the undocumented inmates to the federal government, and that’s embarrassing.

Embarrassing? It’s embarrassing for someone charged with upholding the law of the land to refuse to see that people who have broken both our immigration laws and our penal code are held accountable for their behavior.

Villanueva then accuses the Board of Supervisors of only paying lip service to the “rights of the undocumented,” a/k/a criminal illegal aliens, saying that taking part in SCAAP is a “travesty of justice.”

“You know, behind closed doors they’re selling them out to the federal government. And I need every single member of the Board of Supervisors needs to be held accountable for that. That is a travesty of justice that never should have occurred. It shouldn’t have waited until I showed up in office and find out about it to end the program. It never should have began in the first place.”

No, a travesty of justice is what happens when illegal aliens commit crimes over and over and over again, and when illegal aliens are deported then return to this country to hurt more innocent Americans, as in the case of Ronald da Silva, who was murdered by a gang member who’d been previously deported then returned to Los Angeles County. Da Silva was murdered in 2002 in El Monte, an area of Los Angeles County near where then-Deputy Villanueva lived. It’s a travesty of justice when law enforcement “professionals” like Sheriff Villanueva would rather release illegal alien criminals back to the streets to destroy families than “sell them out” to the federal government.

Sheriff Says Sharing Criminal Illegal Alien Info With ICE is "Selling Them Out" for "Trump Blood Money"

Screenshot, Facebook: Agnes Gibboney

Ronald da Silva’s mother, Agnes Gibboney, shown above speaking at a rally on the day Ronald’s killer was released from prison, is a victim of crime. Ronald’s stepfather, sisters, and children are victims of a crime committed by an “undocumented inmate” in Los Angeles County. Are they the most vulnerable, Sheriff Villanueva?

Jennifer Van Laar
Jennifer Van Laar is Deputy Managing Editor at RedState and founded Save California PAC. Follow her work on Facebook and Twitter. Story tips: [email protected]

 
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