Leading up to the highly anticipated healthcare vote that is scheduled around 3:30pm Eastern Time on Friday, a new poll from a Democratic Super PAC indicates that likely 2018 voters move 33 points away from incumbent Republican legislatures when shown the negative information from the healthcare bill brought forward by Republicans.

“Voters [in GOP districts] move from approving of their congressperson by 12 points(46% approve, 34% disapprove) to disapproving by 21 points (35% approve, 56% disapprove) — a net shift of 33 percentage points,” states a Priorities USA poll, a left-leaning group that polled 1,001 likely 2018 voters into the popularity of the American Health Care Act.

The Priorities USA memo from March 24 stated:

After hearing a positive argument in favor of the GOP plan, information about its provisions and consequences, and messages against their own incumbent for supporting it, we are able to really move the needle in a way that is rarely driven by a single issue, as it is in this case.

The top-testing message against the GOP proposal (as drafted at the time of fielding) is that it allows insurance companies to charge people over age fifty five times more than younger people for their care—with 61% of voters saying this raises “very” big concerns for them. This is the top-testing message among key target groups, garnering “very” big concerns among 75% of those who move on their vote, 66% of independents, 53% of Obama-Trump voters, and 69% of white non-college women.

The Priorities poll highlights the political baggage attached to this healthcare bill and suggests that it would be detrimental to Republicans up for re-election in 2018 that supported the bill in its current form.

Adam Jentleson, who was former Sen. Harry Reid’s (D-NV) deputy chief of staff, has lead the charge of pushing the poll out on Twitter Friday afternoon.

While many media outlets and journalists are reporting that the Trump administration does not currently have enough votes to pass the bill, it appears Trump is still debating whether or not to take the gamble on the House floor.

The vote is still scheduled for around 3:30pm Eastern Time on Friday afternoon.